Praise for Twisted Tales Events

'In the past few years Twisted Tales has become a major force in the promotion and appreciation of horror fiction. As well as putting on author readings and signings at bookshops it has expanded into organising larger events, bringing authors and critics together for discussions of the field. I've been involved in quite a few of both and have found them hugely enjoyable and stimulating - I believe the audiences did as well. May Twisted Tales continue to grow and prosper! If you love the field, support them! I do.' - Ramsey Campbell

‘Twisted Tales consistently produce well-organised events for writers and readers of horror. What really distinguishes Twisted Tales for me is the intelligent themes and investigations they pursue, and the high quality of the discussions they always stimulate. As an author I've been invited to three of their events and have been pleasantly startled, to near shocked, by the attendance levels - two out of three were even sold out. I salute anyone who contributes so much to the literary and cultural life of horror fiction.’- Adam Nevill

'Twisted Tales events are wonderful... a great way of promoting 21st century horror fiction. Supported by Waterstone's Liverpool One and really well organised, Twisted Tales brings together established names in the genre as well as new voices and of course readers. Looking forward to much more to come...' - Alison J. Littlewood

Our Contributors

The Twisted Tales blog could not function without the help of its many contributors:

Laura Bettney is an Assistant Psychologist with a degree in Psychology with Criminology. She is a lifelong fan of horror working on her first short story. Laura also reviews albums and gigs for the American Indie (in the original Pixies, My Bloody Valentine, and Dinosaur Jr sense) online magazine, Delusions of Adequacy.

Allyson Bird now lives and farms in the Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand. Occasionally she is drawn to strange places and people and they are occasionally drawn to her. Her favourite playground, as a child and adult, has been the village graveyard. Once she wondered what would happen if she took one of the green stones from a grave. She has been looking over her shoulder ever since but has never given it back. Winner of the HWA Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a first novel 2011 for Isis Unbound and of the British Fantasy Society Award for Best Collection 2009 for Bull Running for Girls.

Claire Dean was born in Lancashire in 1981. Two of her short stories were recently published as chapbooks by Nightjar Press and others have appeared in various anthologies and magazines. She's an editor and project manager at Litfest and co-editor of Paraxis. She keeps a blog, Gathering Scraps

Timothy Franklin works for Lancashire's literary development agency, Litfest. He's nearing the end of a course in playwriting at the Liverpool Everyman Theatre, and a collection of reviews and mad railings at the government can be found at his blog, Unsuitable for Adults. He's a gamer, and that's where his interest in horror is most keenly focused.

David Hering is writing his Ph.D thesis on American Literature at the University of Liverpool. His reviews have appeared in the Journal of American Studies, Movable Type and venetianvase.co.uk. He is the editor of the essay collection Consider David Foster Wallace: Critical Essays (2010).

Enrique Ajuria Ibarra is a doctoral candidate at Lancaster University.  His thesis project analyses the social and political criticism found in fantasy and horror films from Mexico and Spain, and he has particularly done extensive research on the films of Guillermo del Toro.  He has participated in several conferences both in the UK and abroad and has published book and film reviews for The Gothic Imagination and Re/Action Magazine websites.  His main interests lie in the use of fantasy, horror and gothic theories to explore particular examples from film and literature, both in Spanish and English. 

Paul Kane is an award-winning writer and editor based in Derbyshire, UK. His short story collections include Shadow Writer, The Butterfly Man and Other Stories, The Spaces Between and Ghosts. His novellas include Signs of Life, The Lazarus Condition, RED and Pain Cages. He is the author of such novels as Of Darkness and Light, The Gemini Factor, Sleeper(s) and the bestselling Arrowhead trilogy (collected recently as the sell-out Hooded Man omnibus). His latest novels are Lunar (which is set to be turned into a feature film) and the short Y.A. novel The Rainbow Man (as P.B. Kane). Paul is co-editor of the anthology Hellbound Hearts, The Mammoth Book of Body Horror, A Carniv├ále of Horror, and Beyond Rue Morgue. His non-fiction books are The Hellraiser Films and Their Legacy and Voices in the Dark. His work has been optioned for film and television, and his zombie story ‘Dead Time’ was turned into an episode of the Lionsgate/NBC TV series Fear Itself, adapted by Steve Niles (30 Days of Night) and directed by Darren Lynn Bousman (SAW II-IV). He also scripted The Opportunity, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival, Wind Chimes (directed by Brad ‘7th Dimension’ Watson and sold to TV) and The Weeping Woman – filmed by award-winning director Mark Steensland and starring Tony-nominated actor Stephen Geoffreys (Fright Night).

Alison J. Littlewood’s latest novel, Path of Needles, is published by Jo Fletcher Books. Her first novel, A Cold Season, was selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club, where it was described as “perfect reading for a dark winter’s night.” Alison’s short stories have been picked for the Best Horror of the Year and Mammoth Book of Best New Horror anthologies, as well as The Best British Fantasy 2013 and The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime 10. Her work has also featured in genre magazines Black Static, Crimewave and Dark Horizons.

Adam Nevill was born in Birmingham, England, in 1969 and grew up in England and New Zealand. He is the author of the supernatural horror novels Banquet for the Damned, Apartment 16, The Ritual, Last Days and House of Small Shadows.

David is an Associate Lecturer and doctoral student at Lancaster University under the supervision of Catherine Spooner. His thesis looks at representations of monstrous criminals in contemporary American Gothic culture. He has forthcoming publications in Gothic Studies, the Ashgate Encyclopdeia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters, and The Age of Lovecraft: Cosmic Horror, Posthumanism, and Popular Culture. David is a critic of contemporary genre fiction whose reviews have appeared in Horror Studies, The Gothic Imagination, Vector, Foundation, the Interzone website, and Strange Horizons. - See more at: http://twistedtalesevents.blogspot.co.uk/p/abous-us.html#sthash.GT1ffufd.dpuf
David is an Associate Lecturer and doctoral student at Lancaster University under the supervision of Catherine Spooner. His thesis looks at representations of monstrous criminals in contemporary American Gothic culture. He has forthcoming publications in Gothic Studies, the Ashgate Encyclopdeia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters, and The Age of Lovecraft: Cosmic Horror, Posthumanism, and Popular Culture. David is a critic of contemporary genre fiction whose reviews have appeared in Horror Studies, The Gothic Imagination, Vector, Foundation, the Interzone website, and Strange Horizons. - See more at: http://twistedtalesevents.blogspot.co.uk/p/abous-us.html#sthash.GT1ffufd.dpuf
Chris Pak is a researcher on the Leverhulme funded project 'People, Products, Pests and Pets: The Discursive Representation of the Animal' at the University of Birmingham. He completed a thesis on ecology and politics in science fictional narratives of terraforming at the University of Liverpool but maintains an interest in other fantastic and genre fictions. More information and links to other essays and reviews can be found at his website.

Gwyneth Peaty
recently completed a PhD on the grotesque in pop culture at The University of Western Australia. Her current research focuses on monstrosity, gender, ontology and the Gothic in visual media. Gwyneth's publications include ‘Infected with Life: Neo-supernaturalism and the Gothic Zombie’ in Gothic Science Fiction: 1980-2010 (2011) and ‘“Hatched from the Veins in Your Arms”: Movement, Ontology and First-Person Gameplay in BioShock’ in Guns, Grenades and Grunts: The First Person Shooter (2012), with chapters forthcoming on Fallout 3 and The Walking Dead. She can also be found exploring the grotesque at http://groteskology.blogspot.com 

David Simmons is a Lecturer in American Literature, Film and TV at the University of Northampton. He has published extensively on twentieth century American popular culture. His books include The Anti-Hero in the American Novel: From Heller to Vonnegut (Palgrave, 2008), Investigating Heroes: Truth, Justice and Quality TV (McFarland, 2011) and New Critical Essays on H.P. Lovecraft (Palgrave, 2013). In addition to this he has written on a wide range of subjects including South Park, Supernatural, Hammer Horror, and Video Game TV. David is eagerly awaiting the second series of American Horror Story and hopes it will be as perverse, twisted and generally entertaining as the first.
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If you'd like to see your name here, we always welcome new contributions. Please contact us through twistedtalesevents@gmail.com  for further information.